Exhibits

Life in Sandown
Women's Waiting Room and Freight Room

When the depot was used as a highway garage, the freight room and women's waiting rooms were combined to increase storage space. When the depot was renovated, this became great exhibit space for sharing our collection of items representative of life in town. From the early mills to shoe making at home, connect with the past seeing some of the tools generations before us had used to perform everyday tasks that we now take for granted.

Boston & Maine Railroad's Worcester, Nashua & Portland Division
Men's Waiting Room and Station Agent's Office

Left largely intact from its days of serving the railroad, the men's waiting room and station agent's office offer a chance to step back in time while you wait for the next train. The railroad station in each town was a hive of activity for both businesses and travellers. Ride along from Worcester to Portland with a pictorial history of the line's stations. It's been quite some time since trains have stopped in Sandown, but a model simulating what Sandown looked like at the turn of the century changes your perspective of today's landscape. Take a step into the office of the station agent and see the tools he would have used on the job, including an old telegraph machine to relay messages and the original ticket windows where local residents purchased their train tickets.

Railroad Equipment
Station Platform

On display outside the depot are two flanger cars from the Maine Central Railroad. Snow plows push snow to the side, but what about the snow between the rails? Flanger cars had a small snowplow underneath that would clear the snow under the train. We've renovated one of the railcars for exhibit and meeting space, but the other is in its original appearance. Our two flangers were donated by the late Judge George H. Grinnell of Derry. Led by the U.S. Army's 368th Engineer Battallion, both cars were transported from Derry to Sandown in 1982.

Nicknamed "putt-putts" from the sound of their small gas engines, motorcars allowed track maintenance crews to deliver tools, materials, workers, and inspect tracks without the need for a train. Today's railroad maintenance crews still ride the rails, but no longer with motorcars. Today they use regular pick-up trucks that have small railroad wheels that can be lowered onto the railroad tracks.